Criminal Lawyer Defending Against Violations of Probation in Utah

What is Probation?

An individual who has been convicted of a crime will most often be put on probation. Probation allows the individual to remain a member of the community after his jail time (if any jail time was served) has been completed. Probation consists of rules and regulations that the individual must abide by in order to test his character and redeem his abilities as suitable for work or membership. Probation is different from parole. Probation follows a county jail sentence, or is given as the sole consequence of a crime with no jail time. Parole follows a state prison sentence. Parole is granted after the convicted person serves time in prison.

Probation Violations

There are various ways in which an individual can violate probation.  Often probation holds a condition of a scheduled court appearance every so often to present a progress report of the individual. Failure to appear to such a hearing is a violation. Other violations include, failure to report, violation of any rules given specific to the probation, failure to comply with any rehabilitation or community service, failure to pay fines or restitution to a victim as ordered, possessing of illegal substances, committing a crime, or being arrested. All these are violations of probation and can result in serious consequences.

Consequences for Violating Probation

Consequences of violating probation can include jail time, extension of probation, community service, physical labor, rehabilitation for substance abuse, counseling, revocation of probation and modification of probation terms.

Salt Lake City Probation Violation Lawyer

If you have been accused of violating your probation, contact an attorney from Salcido Law Firm. Attorneys at Salcido Law Firm have the experience you will need in facing an order to show cause hearing for charges of violating probation.  Violation of probation can hold serious consequences. Let the law firm of Salcido Law Firm protect you. Call 801.618.1334 to schedule a free consultation and speak with one of our attorneys.

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